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Hi. It’s been a time, but it’s been a time for healing and planning and preparing. We have let a couple of cycles pass since we lost Rune and are planning to try again in the coming cycle! Huzzah!

I am making this super fast because it is almost time to get things ready for din din time..

After forwarding the article in the Washington Post to the editor of our local paper, Kelly Virden, I was interviewed, along with two other local homebirthers-both friends of mine-for our local paper. Here is the article.

I am happy with it, though I am a tad disappointed that nothing regarding world statistics regarding birth were mentioned, nothing regarding the safety stats of home vs hospital, nothing to the tune of information, only our stories. Don’t get me wrong, I really think that our three stories are crucial to changing mindsets, to helping wimmin realize their innate abilities, but the fact checker in me would have liked to see more to the whys of it instead of just the stories. One thing in my bit of the article that was actually in err, was that I sought prenatal care. I did but only through 20 weeks thereabout, when I was tired of the condescension of the local MDs. I am interested to see what kind of support and backlash we three get over this article.

Let me know what you think of it.

My breasts are fuller than normal. There is extra milk and Zoe is drowning when she latches on. I cry when she latches on-not because it hurts, because, let’s face it, I am a nursing pro by now; but because there is no extra babe to take in the milk meant to feed him.

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Thank you everyone, for your blessings and well wishes. It’s been an incredibly difficult few days.

We had a burial last night in our Sacred Place. We named the baby Rune Dustin and I will have a complete story at some point, when I can see well enough to write. It helps me to write. it always has. Rob and I are both suffering terribly as this babe was so wanted and planned for. We have given him up to the Goddess, though and she will mother him while I can’t.

Here is a photo of our altar from last night. We all definitely felt the generations with us while we mourned and buried our sweet babe.

Rune is in the sugar jar. It’s pretty old one I found with an incomplete set from Japan. Rob is chiseling a stone with his name on it as a marker.

Thanks again for all of your blessings, here, via email, telephone calls from those who know us in real life and the few of you across the internet. They mean a lot more than you can know.

This is it for now. I am turning the computer off for a few days.

I will be away for a few days.

Thanks for your love and support. I will give you details when I feel I can. Every baby has a birth story and this one does too.

I am going to toolize the only General Practicioner that I respect in our community for her doppler today because-for the first time in a pregnancy-I was spotting and it made me lose my mind. She didn’t use the doppler. Instead she used the speculum to just look at my cervix which was closed with no blood around it! YAY!

I didn’t sleep at all last night and I am terrified. I have a little peace if I do miscarry, because I dreamed it shortly after Zoe was born that I got pg, birthed a dead babe and then got pg and birthed a healthy live one. Despite the preparation, I am still freaked out completely and lost it a few times last night. Should worse come to worse, I will labor this loss and have it at home, just as we would a healthy babe.

I have heard that third pregnancies are the wacky ones, so who knows, maybe this is just that, as I don’t have any other symptoms of loss. (this is something she mentioned as well!)

I will keep you updated, but I just wanted to ask that you send some positive energies this way and envision this babe held on tight in my uterus and staying healthy and safe. (thus far we are confident that Sprout is fine. before checking my cervix, blood was drawn and they will test hormone levels just to be on the safe side. Dr. Malling is confident, though, with my cervix closed, that all is fine and it was probably some extra implantation blood. Baby is holding on tight!)

Thanks.

From the BBC News

We didn’t even clamp Zoe’s cord at all. We didn’t cut her from her placenta until about 2 hours afterward and then an hour after that I birthed the placenta. After she as cut from her placenta we just left her dangle. Everything we read gave us no real reason to clamp it off at all. After three days she had her first bath and then e kept it clean with witch hazel.

I like the song in this radio show “So much better when you don’t wait for the ‘experts’ to come…” (quotation mine)

There is a spot about UC as well and the midwife talking about it seems very supportive of it as a womon’s choice. I was pleased with this show.

The midwife also discussed the film “Psalm and Zoya” which is the documentation of Mindy Gorchenko‘s birth of her twins, the first of which vertex and the second was a footling breech. Both babies were born unassisted and peacefully while her husband filmed their arrival.

I own that film and I have to say I love it. It is hilarious at times, and always intense. I have it loaned out to a friend right now who is wanting a UC for her next birth. She has three babies, the last two were born with midwives at a birth center that is 2 hours away. She doesn’t want to go through that again, as she almost didn’t make it with the most recent baby. She and her husband are both highly self aware and very educated people as well and have no qualms other than the mess (which, really, there is not as much mess with birth as people tend to think.)

See the whole story here

Don’t push! The pushing stage of birth is coached in most hospitals and involves the attendants telling the birthing woman when her cervix is fully open (dilated) and encouraging her to give long, strong pushes with each contraction.Previous research shows that coached pushing does not improve the short-term outcome for mothers and babies, except when the baby needs to be born as soon as possible.

This study, conducted by Schaffer and colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, May 2005, randomized 325 women giving birth to coached or uncoached pushing.

Three months later, they measured the pelvic floor and bladder function of 128 of these new mothers.1

The guest commentator on this article is Sarah J. Buckley, M.D.

I got this on a list I am on. It is from Compleat Mother. I give you….

The Obstetrician Song

Enjoy!